SELECT PERSPECTIVES BLOG

3 Advantages to Using Competency Models in Talent Management

Posted by  John Fernandez, Ph.D.

ThinkstockPhotos-466972055More than ever before, HR Leaders understand the value of being strategic when implementing talent management programs within their organizations. They are looking at talent management more holistically and considering how various talent management functions – such as Recruiting & Staffing, Assessment & Selection, Performance Management, and Succession Planning – can be connected and more effectively managed as one end-to-end process.

With any attempt at implementing a strong end-to-end Talent Management program, HR Leaders should consider starting with a competency model. This is because a competency model can serve as the key connecting point between the different talent management functions by defining the standards for success within each of them. Summarized below are three specific advantages that effective competency models provide to talent management programs, particularly when they are developed before the programs are implemented:


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How to Be a Great Hiring Manager

Posted by  Greg Kedenburg

hiring-managerAs one of the most integral pieces of any organization, the hiring manager can really make or break a company. The type of new hires they bring through the door has a massive impact on the success an organization can have. If they’re skilled, hard working employees, the organization will thrive, but if they’re lacking in motivation, experience, or ability, the organization will suffer. The hiring manager helps determine what recruiters look for, what the hiring criteria are, and ultimately whether or not a candidate will turn into an employee. Because of the important role the hiring manager plays, it is important to understand what separates the average hiring manager from the great hiring managers.


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What's Our Best Piece of Hiring Advice? One Team's Perspective

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

chat-bubblesAs a group of human resource consultants with a variety of backgrounds we often find ourselves disagreeing on certain topics. The positive is that those disagreements can incite new knowledge and ways of thinking about a particular problem or issue. Thus, the objective here is to provide a variety of perspectives that have the potential to help organizations who find themselves trying to answer this common question: How do we make sure that we hire the best employee for the job?


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Has Your Organization Met the New OFCCP Requirements?

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

OFCCP-complianceI recently attended a conference that included a large group of Human Resources professionals from organizations large and small to discuss pressing topics in HR and the field of I/O Psychology, in general. In this conference I participated in a forum on two new regulations from the OFCCP (The Office of Federal Contractor Compliance Programs), specifically, changes to Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended and to the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act, as amended.

If you are not aware the premise of these changes is that organizations will now be required to track and report the percentage of disabled and veteran employees, aiming for a target utilization rate (roughly 7% for both). This includes providing the government data on their current workforce and tracking applicant and incumbent data from this point forward.


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What Is Motivational Fit and Is It Really Important in Hiring?

Posted by  Greg Kedenburg

question-markThere are a variety of factors to consider during the hiring process, from experience to education to related job knowledge. Having to consider such a wide range can be overwhelming to a hiring manager. At the risk of adding one more to the list, motivational fit can often make or break it for a candidate in terms of how successful they’ll be in an organization. An often overlooked component, the degree to which a candidate’s motivations align with the organization’s can at times make an even bigger impact on job performance than the aforementioned factors.

What is Motivational Fit?

Motivational fit is defined as the extent to which an employee’s expectations of what they’ll get out of a job match up with what the organization provides. How closely these two match will play a big part in whether or not an employee will stay in any given job. The aspects which make up motivational fit are varied, but can be sorted into two general categories: Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic motivators.


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3 Common Errors Hiring Managers Make When Using Employee Assessments

Posted by  John Fernandez, Ph.D.

errorAs an assessment consultant, I could go on and on about the value of using rigorous assessment tools for selecting better talent into an organization, as well as for developing employees as part of a talent management strategy. There are plenty of data to suggest that well designed assessment tools deliver a competitive edge and provide companies a very significant return on investment.

However, what often gets overlooked when implementing assessment tools is making hiring managers aware of some of the common situations in which they can be used improperly. Below are 3 common errors made when using assessment tools that highlight such situations, followed by a discussion with some specific examples.


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How to Hire Like Google

Posted by  Greg Kedenburg

hiring-handshakeConstantly topping the ‘Best Companies to Work For’ charts, Google is considered to be the golden standard in terms of modern organizations. Aside from making their employee satisfaction one of their main priorities, Google accomplishes this by hiring great people who will thrive in the environment they’ve created. Now while not every company can offer the laundry list of perks that Google can, every company does have the ability to follow the same hiring process as the tech giant.


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4 Reasons That You Absolutely Need a Consistent Hiring Process

Posted by  Brian Dishman

hiring-processStandardized work is one of the fundamental building blocks of a lean manufacturing process. It should be the initial building block of a lean hiring process. Any good manufacturing Quality Manager understands that you cannot guarantee quality without a standard procedure in place to ensure consistency of the process. As a human resources consultant, I am frequently surprised by the number companies that lack defined, standardized hiring processes. Many companies rely on their hiring managers to devise their own interviews and simple tests for evaluating the job candidates to fill open positions within their team. There are serious flaws with this approach. Below are four reasons that a standardized candidate evaluation process leads to higher quality hires:


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What Is I/O Psychology and How Can It Help You Hire?

Posted by  Greg Kedenburg

io-psychologyIndustrial-organizational psychology is still a relatively young field in comparison to some of the other social sciences. Yet to break through to the mainstream, mention I/O psychology to the average person and you’ll likely be met with blank stares or questions more suited for a clinical psychologist. Despite this, I/O psychology has been gaining traction in workplaces across the world as more and more organizations begin to see the value that trained industrial-organizational psychologists can bring to the table. These days, efficiency rules all, and decreasing waste, in whatever form it presents itself, is a goal of many organizations. One of the best ways to do this may be learning about what industrial-organizational psychology has to offer.


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Four Risks to Avoid When Evaluating Pre-Employment Assessments

Posted by  John Fernandez, Ph.D.

evaluateAny company that decides to start using a pre-hire assessment tool to screen external job candidates should do their due diligence when choosing a new test. The ultimate goal should be finding an assessment that will help the company raise the bar on the talent selected into the organization for the target position. This process includes reviewing any available validation evidence for the test, and ensuring a thorough job analysis is completed prior to implementing it.

However, sometimes companies devise alternative means for vetting a new test that can lead to inaccurate or uninformed interpretations of its effectiveness. One such example is when stakeholders want to see how well the test works at identifying the top current employees. In other words, they want to have some employees take the test to find out if the best ones score the highest, and the worst ones score the lowest. If test results indeed show these patterns, then the test is deemed to be effective. However, if top performers do poorly and/or poor performers do well, then they believe the test will not work effectively at their company, no matter how good the validation evidence may be.


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