SELECT PERSPECTIVES BLOG

Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

Steven Jarrett is a Senior Consultant at Select International. He has extensive experience developing, implementing, and validating legally defensible selection solutions for organizations. Steven has worked in a variety of industries including manufacturing, retail, healthcare and education.
Find me on:

Recent Posts

How to Get HR and Operations to Agree on Employee Assessments

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

agreement.jpgThe epic battle wages on as two sides fight tirelessly in an effort to impose their will and dominate the corporate landscape. Are we talking about Google vs. Amazon? No, this battle is between operations and human resources, and although these should be two symbiotic groups that work together towards their common goal, often times they are not.

Operations can often feel overwhelmed by all of the policies, practices, and procedures that HR puts into place, while HR can often get frustrated by the shortcuts of operations to circumvent these practices. One area where I have found this to most often be the case is with the selection of new employees and the decision on who to hire. Even taking a step back, a tough question can be: How does the organization select new employees into the organization?


CONTINUE READING

5 Ways to Improve the Legal Defensibility of Your Hiring Process

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

legal-defensibility.jpgWhat defines an effective selection system? That can depend greatly on who you ask within an organization. Specifically, if you ask operations it is a system that hires top quality candidates quickly; for human resources it is a system that is easy to administer and allows them to track and process candidates quickly; for legal however, it is the system that creates less work for them a.k.a. does not get the organization sued. Some may believe that these are differing goals, but in our opinion they do not have to be. Here are five recommendations on how your organization can improve, or create, a legally defensible hiring system that can also hire effective individuals quickly.


CONTINUE READING

How to Make Working From Home, Work for Your Company

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

working-remotely.jpgWorking remotely, teleworking and telecommuting. There are all terms to describe the working situation of an individual who does not work in an office defined in the traditional sense of the term. The numbers of those workers are growing; according to the American Community Survey, reported by GlobalWorkplaceAnalytic.com, as of 2014, 2.5% of the workforce in the U.S. now works from home at least half of the time, which is a 102% increase from 2005.

When determining whether an employee should be permitted to work from home, there are several factors for a company to consider. It is important to weigh the benefits with the challenges; certainly there are some cost savings for the employer for items such as office space, furniture and supplies. But there are also aspects of being in the office that are difficult for remote employees to benefit from, such as the possibility of face-to-face interaction and impromptu meetings. Additionally, managers may have some concerns about supervising a remote employee, particularly whether the employee will be responsive and productive.


CONTINUE READING

4 Tips to Building the Perfect Selection System

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

hiring-candidateIf you read this blog regularly, then you've been reading a lot lately about the advantages of using assessments and other objective methods in your hiring system. Hopefully, you have decided to give them a shot. Decision made. Now it’s easy, right? What else could there be? Almost as important as choosing the correct selection tool is building the proper selection process. There are a lot of factors to consider when deciding on the selection process, including, number of potential applicants, objectivity of the hiring system, managing hiring manager expectations, cost, time, administrative burden, and many more. Here are a few pointers that can help you create a system that is cost-effective, valid, and practical:


CONTINUE READING

What's Our Best Piece of Hiring Advice? One Team's Perspective

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

chat-bubblesAs a group of human resource consultants with a variety of backgrounds we often find ourselves disagreeing on certain topics. The positive is that those disagreements can incite new knowledge and ways of thinking about a particular problem or issue. Thus, the objective here is to provide a variety of perspectives that have the potential to help organizations who find themselves trying to answer this common question: How do we make sure that we hire the best employee for the job?


CONTINUE READING

Has Your Organization Met the New OFCCP Requirements?

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

OFCCP-complianceI recently attended a conference that included a large group of Human Resources professionals from organizations large and small to discuss pressing topics in HR and the field of I/O Psychology, in general. In this conference I participated in a forum on two new regulations from the OFCCP (The Office of Federal Contractor Compliance Programs), specifically, changes to Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended and to the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act, as amended.

If you are not aware the premise of these changes is that organizations will now be required to track and report the percentage of disabled and veteran employees, aiming for a target utilization rate (roughly 7% for both). This includes providing the government data on their current workforce and tracking applicant and incumbent data from this point forward.


CONTINUE READING

Six Questions to Ask When Choosing an Employee Assessment Provider

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

QuestionsBig data, analytics, informed decision-making are all buzz words that are taking the business world by storm. Within this movement, of more informed decision-making, more and more companies are trying to get “smarter” about how they hire their new employees. This has led to an increase in the use of assessments to make hiring decisions. As with any demand, as their usage increases, the number of assessment vendors also increases. So, how can someone new to the assessment industry differentiate the quality vendors from the opportunistic vendors? Here are some questions that you should be asking all potential vendors to help you determine which company will provide the best solution for your organization.


CONTINUE READING

Should You Use a Job Simulation in Hiring?

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

174772259Every organization – large or small, public or private, profitable or not – can share in the pain of trying to hire new talent into the organization. Talk with any hiring manager who has been at it for awhile, and they will have an exemplar story of the one bad hire who snuck through their process. Hiring is difficult, no doubt about it. We often have to wonder if the polished professional individual sitting across us in the interview will be the same person who shows up to work 6 months, 1 year, or 5 years down the road. People will often say the best predictor of future performance is an individual’s past performance (on a similar type of job). I can now hear the collective masses retorting, “How the heck am I supposed to know how they performed at their old job, and furthermore, what if they have never done this new job?”


CONTINUE READING

Employee Assessments: Shorter, Faster, Better?

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

How would you like an assessment that can measure all of the aspects that are important to job performance for a variety of positions within your organization? And, how would you like it if that assessment only took 5 minutes to complete? If I heard this sales pitch, the next thing I would expect to hear is, “If you do not like this I also have some magic beans in the back and I will trade them for only one cow.”

In a world where information is at our fingertips, we can transfer money from a plane and connect with six friends from six continents in an instant, companies want faster ways to process and onboard employees. This is especially the case for entry-level employees where HR staffs fear that if things take too long they will lose out on quality candidates. In some cases this is very true, instant feedback is important, and scheduling for the next stage in the process should be done real-time, if possible. However, when it comes to trying to determine if an individual has the right knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform well in the role, saving a few extra minutes will hurt significantly in the long run. A wise man once told me, “You need to go slow, to go fast.” Using a longer test to make the correct hiring decision will certainly be a better solution than using a shorter test to potentially make a poor decision.


CONTINUE READING

5 Instances When the Resume Can Still Help in the Hiring Process

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

 “Send me your resume and I will take a look at it.” A phrase that would seem to date back to before paper was first created. One could imagine the Egyptians chiseling their qualifications into stone to see who will be the next chef for the Pharaoh, trying ever so hard not to make a mistake so that he does not have to re-sharpen his chisel!  Resumes seem relatively archaic with the technology that is at our disposal in today’s world. Especially, with the increased use of social media, we have more information at our finger tips about a senior from X University than JFK had for the Cuban Missile Crisis.

459907417

Researchers will say that a resume review is one of the worst predictors of future success behind letters of recommendation. If this is the case why would companies continue to collect them and use them in the hiring process? Since I cannot answer that question, I will answer the question of when do they actually matter

 

 

Here are 5 examples of when the information

you find on a candidate’s resume are instant red flags: 

1) They provided information about the degree they received from X University and X University has never heard of them.  Let’s be honest, a candidate may get away with this one, but if you do your due diligence and find out they did not attend the mentioned university, please see their resume to the trash.

2) Under the objective statement it reads: I want a job. Companies don’t want people who want jobs anymore; they want people who want careers. Yep, even the local fast food chain is thinking about their next manager when they are hiring their grease boy.

3) Work Experience: N/A.  Nothing? The candidate has nothing? Unless the job does not require a resume, which many do not, the candidate is going to have a hard time selling their skills.

4) The resume has more typos than a 5th graders first book report.  Sure. Typos can happen to n e one – but if a candidate can’t get it write on there resume, it can be a read flag. (see what I did there)

5) If it was illegal, immoral, or just plain stupid, make sure it is not on the resume.  No explanation needed.

That perfectly crafted resume (with 70% embellished information) may not give you all the information to find the perfect candidate, but without a doubt, a poorly crafted one can show hiring managers red flags about candidates before they take the next step in the hiring process.

Don’t rely on a perfectly scripted piece of paper to determine who to hire. Instead, follow industry best practices through the use of objective selection assessments, structured interviews, and defined criteria to help you understand what competencies are necessary for the role and who in your applicant pool has those competencies.

 

           

CONTINUE READING

Subscribe to Email Updates

Recent Posts

Discover the cost-saving benefits of hiring the right employees, the first time.

REQUEST A DEMO