SELECT PERSPECTIVES BLOG

3 Tips for Giving Employee Feedback

Posted by  Alissa Parr, Ph.D.

One big myth of employee feedback systems is that all supervisors want to give feedback and all subordinates want to receive it. It’s often, if not always, the case that supervisors want their employees to grow and develop but apprehension grows when faced with the idea of providing negative feedback to employees. Similarly, subordinates want to improve their skills and performance but may be hesitant to hear this information from their supervisor. Therefore, it’s important to consider best practices of feedback giving so supervisors can be more confident in giving feedback and subordinates can be more willing to hear feedback and then take actionable steps to improve.


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The Success of the Spurs and Your Hiring Process

Posted by  Eli Castruita

Many teams in the NBA look to the San Antonio Spurs as the model of success.  They have recorded the best winning percentage of any team in the four major sports over the last 16 years and they made it to their fifth NBA Finals this year!  During those 16 years the Spurs organization has twice been named the best franchise in professional sports and been ranked the top NBA franchise six times in the annual ESPN The Magazine Ultimate Standing Survey.


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Keeping Top Talent at Your Company Isn’t All About Luck

Posted by  Amber Thomas


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Select International's SIOP 2012 Presentations

Posted by  TJ Muehlfeld

Follow us @select_intl to get up to date coverage on everything SIOP 2012!.


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Job Candidate Reaction to Healthcare Employee Assessments

Posted by  Bryan Warren

Structured selection tools have been used for decades in many industries.  If properly designed and used, they improve quality, reduce turnover, reduce injuries and enhance legal defensibility.


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Healthcare Hiring: 8 Questions a Physician Should Ask You During an Interview

Posted by  Bryan Warren

In an interesting twist in healthcare hiring, we now have physicians seeking advice on how to “select” their employer.  They realize that the financial success and the personal satisfaction of their career will depend, to a large extent, on choosing the right situation.  They come out of residency poorly prepared to evaluate potential practice settings, be they with a group or a hospital.  Not surprisingly, a few years into their career, they often discover that it is not what they were looking for and they are back to square one.  This is not the sort of career uncertainty they envisioned when they entered the medical profession.


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5 Things about Employee Assessments That Everyone Should Know

Posted by  Amber Thomas

assessment-test.jpgSo, you know a thing or two about employee assessments, how they can help create a productive and legally defensible hiring process, how they provide more data about the Joe Schmoe’s sending you resumes, and how they can make your life easier by narrowing down your candidate pool. But did you know that…

  1. Candidates are more honest on assessments than when talking to you. It’s true, not everyone likes to tell the truth about their prevalence for absenteeism, anti-social behaviors or theft but they’re more likely to admit to these behaviors on an assessment.

  2. Assessments are more objective than you are. We are creatures hard-wired for social interaction. This means that we all (to some degree or another) have subconscious preferences and attitudes towards different types of people. An assessment won’t tell you if your candidate’s a snappy dresser, but it can tell you about work-related competencies that correlate to success on the job.


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5 Things about Applicant Faking in Assessment Tests That Everyone Should Know

Posted by  Amber Thomas

No one likes a liar, right? Dishonesty is not something that most people are comfortable with, because it implies that someone is trying to “pull one over on us” or “get away with something”. It follows, logically, that you wouldn’t want someone to “fake good” on pre-employment applications, their resumes, assessments, or in interviews. We want to know what we are going to get when we hire someone into the organization. We feel personally offended when someone turns out to be different than what they said they were (especially if we’re doing the hiring!). With all of this being said, it might surprise you to know that applicant faking is not always as bad as you may think. Here are five reasons that this may be the case:

  1. You may not have the perfect work environment. That’s right; there is a possibility that not every day of work is going to go smoothly for your new employee. Someone that can’t “fake” being satisfied with the job might turn into a disgruntled employee that just can’t play nice. In the world of I/O psychology we call this impression management. If your work environment isn’t perfect you may want someone that can
    roll with the punches and put a smile on even in less than desirable circumstances.
  2. You may want someone that knows what you want. Research has indicated that applicants that are “Open to Ideas” are more likely to be able to “fake” what you’re looking for (Raymark & Tafero, 2009). As a personality variable, Openness to Ideas is used to describe individuals that are curious, intelligent and likely to enjoy doing activities that provide a lot of mental effort. They have an awareness of what it takes to be successful on the job, and this in itself may lend to performance gains.
  3. The faker might just be motivated to do a good job. Many of us have taken the SAT or the GRE. I don’t know about you, but I studied intensely for those exams. The applicant that spends time figuring out the “right” answers might just be more motivated to get the job, or to make a good impression. Whether you’re asking them to complete a skills test, a personality assessment or a simulation exercise, the candidate that has gone out of their way to learn “what works” is going to be more motivated to meet your expectations.
  4. They motivate you to build a better mouse trap. We spend a lot of time at Select researching applicant faking and trying to find ways to make sure that our assessments and exercises are less susceptible to faking. At the same time, applicants have to be more motivated, able to determine what the employer is looking for, and just generally more willing to wear a smile (even if they’re not feeling perky).  They keep you on your toes, and vice versa!
  5. You can measure competencies in multiple ways. Perhaps you think you have a faker on your hands and you’re not quite sure what to do. Having a process that is designed to hit on critical competencies more than once (with a structured phone screen and interview process, for example) will increase the odds that you will find out the applicants true ability to perform on important competencies. Even within an assessment, you can include multiple measurement methods (different types of items) to help get the best measure of a person’s “true” abilities.   It might just be the case that you have the perfect candidate on your hands!

So the next time you’re wondering if an applicant is too good to be true, consider for a moment that maybe they are. But is that really so bad?

 

how to conduct interviews
References

 

Raymark, P. H., & Tafero, T. L. (2009). Individual Differences in the Ability to Fake on Personality Measures. Human Performance, 22(1), 86-103.


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What Role Does Selection Play in Patient Centered Care?

Posted by  Bryan Warren

We hear it all the time – “Patient-Centered Care”.  Is it just the latest buzzword?  Is it some vague, un-obtainable goal?  Once we know what it is, how do we achieve it?

A definition of patient centered care advanced by the Institute for Health Care Improvement (IHI) includes:

Consideration of “patients’ cultural traditions, their personal


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When Free Pre-Employment Assessment Tests Become Expensive

Posted by  Matthew O'Connell, Ph.D.

124322561Companies use tests as part of their pre-employment selection process for a number of reasons. One of them is to efficiently screen a large number of candidates into a more manageable number. Another reason is to accurately and fairly identify individuals who are more likely to be successful on the job. The use of accurate tools in the selection process can significantly improve a company’s chances of selecting the right people.

Most studies that look at the return on investment (ROI) for improved selection processes show that the cost of more accurate screening tools is almost atrivial expense when compared to the return in terms of hiring better people who are less likely to turnover. For instance, if using a more accurate test would help you hire a salesperson who sold $100,000 more every year than another person, wouldn’t you be willing to spend $1,000 for that test? Put that way, the answer is obvious. The problem is the situation is never that simple, or at least it doesn’t seem that simple. There are two things working against us when we make decisions about comparing tests and selection systems.


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