SELECT PERSPECTIVES BLOG

3 Ways A Validation Study Makes Your Employee Selection Process Better

Posted by  Steven Jarrett, Ph.D.

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All organizations need to measure the effectiveness of their selection tools. Some may not know what a validation study is and that it’s available to provide a significant benefit to your selection process, or some may think the only time to conduct one would be if there are legal challenges. However, there are many reasons to conduct a validation study that are not directly related to legal challenges. A criterion-related validation study examines the scores on a pre-employment assessment and how they correlate with performance on the job, such that one would expect that individuals who score higher on your assessment tool perform better on the job than individuals who scored lower on the assessment. This process can be used not only on assessments, but any part of your selection process.


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The Top 10 Human Resources Articles of 2017

Posted by  Claire McCue

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The overhaul of performance management, AI, the rise of the gig economy, HR and recruitment automation, prioritization of the candidate and employee experience, gamification, and millennials becoming the majority workforce are just a few of the changes that 2017 brought to the workplace.


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4 Best Practices for Legally Defensible Interviews

Posted by  Cassandra Walter

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If we were playing a game to see which part of the hiring process would result in the most litigation, the interview would easily take the cake! Poorly structured interviews are more likely to result in litigation than other aspects of the hiring process, including cognitive ability and personality assessments. However, if done correctly and in a legally defensible manner, interviews can be great tools used to determine which candidates have the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to be successful on the job.


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Are Employee Assessments the Same as IQ Tests?

Posted by  Jaclyn Menendez

Recently, I was talking with a friend who was in the middle of applying for a position at a new organization. He mentioned that the latest stage of the application was an IQ test. I am always curious about employee assessment processes for organizations, so I probed a bit more and asked him what it consisted of. “Oh, you know,” he replied, “it asked me things like if I like working with other people, and if I lose my temper easily.”


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The Most Common Interview Questions that Can Get You in Legal Trouble

Posted by  Jaclyn Menendez

We all know that interviewing can be a scary process. You’re wearing a tie that is too tight, you’re trying to keep all your witty anecdotes in order, and you’re terrified that you’ll slip up and say something that could cost you the job. But believe it or not, the interview process is equally nerve-wracking for your interviewer. They want to give a good impression of the company, but still get all the information they need to make an informed decision. Most importantly, just like you, they are concerned that they’ll say the wrong thing.


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5 Keys to Streamlining Your Hiring Process

Posted by  Rachel Reid

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Now that you have made the decision to streamline your hiring process, what happens next? First of all, it’s great that you’ve made this decision! An efficient hiring system not only increases a positive candidate experience and reduces time to hire, but can translate into financial savings for the company.

A more streamlined hiring process will allow you to fill open positions with quality candidates much quicker than a non-streamlined process. However, before you can jump into this process, there are a few guidelines you should be aware of to help make this project run as smoothly as possible.


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Is It Legal to Avoid Hiring Smokers? (And Should You?)

Posted by  Alissa Parr, Ph.D.

hiring-smokers.jpgThe objectives of most hiring processes are to identify and retain individuals who are going to be productive and efficient workers as well as those who embody the values of the organization. Organizations invest in employees. They want to see a return on their investment for individuals.

Most of the time, organizations focus on how employee performance and engagement will help them move toward that goal. However, another element that organizations may consider is how employees will create revenue for the organization and save the organization money. How, might you ask?

Recently, there has been a trend to include a question within the application process that asks about a personal habit: smoking. Organizations are using this question as a knock-out question. If people admit to smoking, they will not be hired. At first, this seems irrelevant to the job…but let’s take a closer look at this topic.


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7 Scary Interview Questions That You Should Never Ask to Candidates

Posted by  Vicki Marlan

halloween.jpgIn many aspects, the hiring process is similar to a game of poker in that each side is trying to gather as much information as they can to determine when they should bet and when they should fold. Organizations who allow untrained interviewers to conduct unstructured interviews are creating an environment where the candidate has the upper hand.

Asking poorly developed interview questions is really no better than playing a poker hand blind. And the worst part is that the interviewer (or poker player who is playing the blind hand) believes they have enough information to make a good decision. This fact creates an environment where organizations continue to ask the same bad interviewing questions and also continue to make poor hiring decisions.


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Can Asking about Salary in the Interview Lead to Discrimination?

Posted by  Alissa Parr, Ph.D.

wage-gap.jpgHow many applications have you completed that asked about salary or wage at previous jobs? Or, maybe I should frame the question, how many applications have NOT asked you this question? Several applications ask job candidates to disclose their salary at prior places of employment as a means to understand what their expectations may be and what may be a good starting salary for the candidate. However, this soon may be a question you’ll need to be cautious asking job candidates.

In a landmark decision, Massachusetts recently passed a pay equity law. This law requires employers to pay men and women equally for comparable work. They define “comparable work” as work situations that require substantially similar skill, effort, and responsibility and work that is performed under similar conditions. This ruling makes it very clear that it is unlawful to discriminate by providing genders different wages.


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How (And Why) to Increase Organizational Diversity

Posted by  Greg Kedenburg

organizational-diversity.jpgIncreasing diversity seems to be a goal shared by most companies these days. The concept of rounding out your workforce by adding more diverse employees is not a new one, but the recent surge in the number of companies claiming to be committed to diversity raises the question of how many of them are truly invested in the cause and how many are promoting the idea, but not taking appropriate steps to become a diverse workforce. Unfortunately, some organizations do fall into the latter category, adding ‘Diversity’ to their list of corporate values, but not taking the right steps to achieve diversity.

These organizations are missing out because there are direct, demonstrable benefits to increasing a workforce’s diversity. There are many companies that genuinely strive to make themselves more diverse, but the process behind this transition is not always clear or obvious. Below are some steps that can help guide the introduction of diversification efforts into a workplace.


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