SAFETY PERSPECTIVES

People in Energy Conference Recap

Posted by  Chris Klinvex

I recently presented the topic of The Psychology of Safety:  Reducing Personal Exposure Through SafetyDNA” at the People in Energy Conference.  Select International sponsored the event, held this year in Houston, October 28-30th.  The conference is specifically dedicated to unique HSE and HR challenges and demands faced by organizations and suppliers in the energy sector.

There is one core question in the safety industry that directly impacts incident rates and it is almost never asked - “are certain employees inherently safer than others?”  With all things being equal which includes the state-of-the-art safety training, systems, and PPE we provide our employees, are certain individuals still more likely to experience a safety incident than others and why? 

To answer this question, let’s recall experiences we’ve had with others that made us feel eerily unsafe, to the point we backed away or proactively attempted to rectify the situation. Whether it was as a passenger in their speeding car, climbing a ladder they were supposedly securing it, or a participant cooking on an open campfire while someone kept rearranging the logs. Let me state the obvious; yes - some of us are inherently safer than others!  Safety incident research confirms this in a big way time and time again.  For instance a recent study in Washington State found that even with tough “click it or ticket fines and enforcement” still 5% of motor vehicle occupants refused to wear their seat belts and they accounted for almost half of the motor vehicle fatalities in the state.*

Now we know the answer to the first question, the second question is even tougher.  What are those innate safety traits, or SafetyDNA®, that impact our personal safety, and can these traits be accurately and reliably measured?  The good news is we have, through extensive research, identified and validated many of those innate safety traits that play an important role in our personal safety. Below is an example of some of these traits:    

  • Thrill seeking

  • Short-term memory recall

  • Emotional control

  • Cognitive overload

  • Impulsivity 

To learn more about how innate safety traits can impact our personal safety behavior, download our whitepaper below:

safetydna

* THE LAST FIVE PERCENT: WHO ARE THE NON-USERS OF SEAT BELTS IN WASHINGTON STATE? By Melissa M. Beard and Philip M. Salzberg, PhD; Dec. 2005

Tags:   safety training, safety management, SafetyDNA, turnover

Chris Klinvex

Chris Klinvex, EVP and Co-Founder, Select International, Inc., leads the Safety Solutions Group focused on innovative research based safety solutions that are changing how organization approach workplace safety. His team’s most recent award for the new SafetyDNA® Assessment and Development program won the prestigious 2017 Best Online Safety training award from Occupational Health and Safety.

Subscribe to Email Updates

Recent Posts

The SafetyDNA® Assessment and Development Program:  Making Safety Personal

Learn More