SAFETY PERSPECTIVES

Companies Investing in Health & Safety Have Higher Stock Returns

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

While worker health and safety is a top priority for many organizations today, it can still be a tough sell to invest significant amounts of time, money or resources into preventative efforts that do not always have a highly tangible or swift return on investment. In the past decade, however, we have seen an increasing number of studies showing that investing proactively in safety can result in sizeable returns on investment. For example, a Liberty Mutual study cited by the American Society of Safety Engineers found that for every $1 spent on safety, they saved at least $3, with an average return of $4.41. Similar estimates have been suggested by different researchers and organizations, including OSHA.


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Minimize Noise Exposure Risk In Your Workplace

Posted by  Craig White

Is there a lot of noise in your work environment? Is the noise level potentially damaging to your hearing? If so, then you are among the approximately 22 million American workers who are exposed to hazardous noise on the job. What safety experts find most concerning about loud noise at work is that the effects of excessive noise exposure are usually not immediate. Rather, hearing loss can take years, sometimes decades, to occur. Consequently, workers often fail to take the necessary precautions to protect their ears because they are not thinking about the long-term damage from prolonged noise exposure. This has resulted in around 125,000 cases of significant, permanent hearing loss in a 10 year span.


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Improving Safety Behavior: The Power of Commitment & Consistency

Posted by  Brian Dishman

If I could brainwash employees into acting safer, how would I do it? Documented brainwashing techniques include isolating persons, repetitive messaging under stress, controlling information from outside sources, and creating doubts in their beliefs. That’s what cults do. It doesn’t sound pleasant or practical. There is probably a company rule against this sort of stuff. HR won’t like the mess. So, what can we do to improve our employees' commitment to safer behavior that doesn’t involve psychological torture?


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Reasons for Trying a Personal Approach to Safety Leadership

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

About a year ago we started working with a manufacturing company – one of their sites had been struggling with high incident rates for the previous couple of years. Their TRIR was significantly higher than the industry norm and they were having a significant issue with slips, trips and falls. When we began working with their leadership team, we realized that they had a great set of dedicated, seasoned supervisors, who had a strong work ethic and wanted to do the right thing. However, there was one problem – they didn’t necessarily have the strongest people skills. While this was apparent immediately upon meeting them, it was later confirmed when they completed a safety leadership assessment which measured their leadership style.


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The Power of "WHY" When Communicating Employee Safety

Posted by  Brian Dishman

Which of these two employee safety signs do you find more persuasive? I’ll tell you how I feel when I look at them. I mostly follow rules, so I like to think I wouldn’t touch the sign on the left. As for the sign on the right… Not only would I not touch it, I would feel very uncomfortable being in the same room as that sign. Get me away from it! These two signs could hang on the same type of machine. Both signs want me to comply. However, for me, one of them is more persuasive. The one on the right gives me an almost physical reaction. Why is that?


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Why You Shouldn't Rationalize Unsafe Behavior

Posted by  David Juristy

In August of 2015, tragedy struck at Cedar Point amusement park in Sandusky, Ohio. James A. Young, a special education teacher from East Canton, Ohio lost his phone and wallet while riding the roller coaster called the Raptor. While the coaster was still in operation, James was struck and killed attempting to retrieve his items after he jumped the fence surrounding a restricted area.

This event was as tragic as it was preventable, and all the more reason we need be aware of our SafetyDNA and those drivers that guide us to make snap decisions when under pressure or stress is applied.


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Differences between External and Internal Factors of Employee Safety [Video]

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

We're publishing our first ever Safety Perspectives vlog today! Esteban Tristan, Ph.D., Director of Safety Solutions at Select International takes a moment to discuss the differences between the external and internal factors of employee safety, and why it's important for organizations to understand and focus on both to reduce at-risk behavior in the workplace.


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Four Tips for Making Your Safety Observations More Impactful

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

How valuable is the information you are currently getting from your behavioral safety observations? Is it worth the time your employees are putting into the process? Safety observations have been a part of everyday life in many organizations for decades, and there are many different schools of thought and opinions about their effectiveness and how they should be done. I work with companies large and small, across multiple industries and I can tell you that for some companies it works wonderfully and truly helps reduce risks, and for others, they simply go through the motions and get very little out of it.


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How Gray Areas in Your Safety Policies Affect Employee Safety

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

Does your company have any safety policies or procedures that are somewhat unclear or ambiguous? Are there certain safety rules that are interpreted somewhat differently depending on the situation, or who you talk to? If so, you probably have some safety policies that have “gray areas” and you’re certainly not alone. Many safety professionals and employees I talk to in different industries deal with this and it can be challenging.


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Two Simple Questions that can Improve Your Personal Safety

Posted by  Brian Dishman

In previous blogs, we've discussed how our intuitive system impacts our decision making. Cognitive biases such as the overconfidence effect, ostrich effect, availability heuristic, social proof, and many other heuristics impact decision making and our personal safety. Several blog readers have asked us how to avoid the potential safety negative outcomes of these mental “rules of thumb.”


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