SAFETY PERSPECTIVES

Managing Employee Safety at Home and Work

Posted by  Guest Blog

One of the clichés in the occupational safety world is that our goal is to ensure that our employees get to go home each day the same way they came. The implication here is that we make them safe in the dangerous workplace until they can get to the safety of their homes. But what if home is not the safest place for them to be?


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The Next Step to Improving an Already Strong Safety Culture

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

I was recently doing some development training for a global manufacturing company with a large presence here in North America. Overall, this organization has a great safety culture and has a pretty comprehensive safety management system. Not surprisingly, their TRIR (Total Recordable Incidence Rate) is currently below 1.0. However, they are actively looking for steps to get to 0.5 or lower and take the next step in terms of their safety journey.

In preparation for my training, I was reviewing some of their incident reports from the past year and noticed a similar trend. Regardless of the department where it occurred, the nature of the event, or the employee’s experience level, none of the injuries were due to any safety rule violations. In addition, they all tended to occur on tasks that were rare or unexpected. In some of the incidents, investigations revealed that there were actually no documented procedures for how to safely complete one of the steps in the process because it was rare or had such little risk associated with it. Simply put, these were not simple, garden variety safety incidents. They were more complex, and had various potential precursors related to anything from ergonomics to training to equipment maintenance.


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Examining the Amtrak Safety Incident Through the Lens of SafetyDNA

Posted by  David Juristy

On Sunday, April 3, 2016, an Amtrak train traveling southbound from New York City to Savannah, GA. struck a backhoe with Amtrak personnel performing maintenance near Philadelphia, PA. The incident killed two Amtrak workers and injured more than thirty passengers. This was a tragic event, but one that could have easily been avoided had the parties involved been aware of their blind spots when it came to their personal SafetyDNA.


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4 Simple Safety Behaviors That Put You at Risk on Ladders

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

Every year, falls from height are a leading cause of fatalities and serious injuries, according to OSHA statistics. A large percentage of these falls are from ladders, which are so common on worksites. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has reported that over 40% of fatal workplace falls involve ladders, and in the Construction industry, this number goes all the way up to 80%.

It’s no surprise, therefore, that ladder safety is a frequent and critical topic for safety professionals in any industry. From the type of ladder, to proper placement and usage, there are various aspects to consider. So if there is so much information out there about ladder safety, why are there still so many ladder-related injuries?


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3 Reasons Why Contractors Often Fail at Safety

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

A few years ago I was touring a coal mine in Australia as part of a project to help improve employee safety. We were just about to wrap up our tour when a small truck sped past us on the dirt road, leaving us in a large, billowing cloud of dust. I couldn’t help but comment to the Mine Superintendent, who was our tour guide, “Wow – seemed like he was going pretty fast, huh?” He immediately responded, “Yeah, that’s that (expletive) contractor again. The speed limit is 40 km per hour on this road! We’ve already talked to them twice about that.”


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How the "Overconfidence Effect" Affects Employee Safety

Posted by  Brian Dishman

This is Part 5 of our series on how cognitive biases affect workplace safety. Click here to read Part 1, click here for Part 2, here is Part 3, and click here for Part 4.

“Don’t worry I got this” is a dangerous phrase. The overconfidence effect is a cognitive bias that frequently leads to recordable incidents and a lot of near misses. The overconfidence effect has been studied extensively within the context of decision making and risk taking.

A well-known study asked drivers to compare the safety of their driving to the other drivers participating in the study. 88% indicated that they were safer than the average driver. 60% said that they think they are one of the top 20% in terms of driving safely. Clearly there is a disconnect between perceived ability and reality. This is the overconfidence effect and it can be deadly.


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The 80/20 Rule in Safety – a Few People, a Lot of Incidents

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

You’ve probably heard of the "80/20 Rule" many times before, or at the very least, you’re familiar with the concept. The 80/20 Rule refers to Pareto’s Principle, or Pareto’s Law. This is basically the observation that about 80% of outcomes or results are attributable to about 20% of inputs or activities.

It's named after the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who developed a theory and formula which described that that twenty percent of the people in Italy owned eighty percent of the wealth. Following this, Dr. Joseph M. Juran attributed the 80/20 Rule to Pareto in the 1940’s and called it Pareto's Principle. It has since been applied to many fields of study, including economics, business, science, and sports.

Perhaps you have experienced this in different areas of your work or personal life, where a few things, or people, lead to the majority of outcomes (whether positive or negative). For example, have you ever felt like:


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Our 6 Most Popular Workplace Safety Blog Posts of 2016

Posted by  Mark Rogers

It’s been a busy year for Select International’s safety team. We’ve spent the year helping companies hire safer employees, identify their employees’ SafetyDNA, and of course writing tons of blogs posts. Altogether, we’ve published 49 blog posts this year. This one is number 50.

The part about blog writing that I love is that some blog posts catch fire and get thousands of views. That’s always a good thing. We make it our goal for this blog to never sell our products. We just want to educate, inform, and sometimes entertain our readers. We definitely accomplished that this year.

With that, here are our 6 most popular workplace safety blog posts of 2016. Starting with number 6...


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4 Ways Your SafetyDNA Impacts Serious Injuries and Fatalities (SIFs) Risk

Posted by  Esteban Tristan, Ph.D.

Serious injuries and fatalities, commonly referred to as SIFs, are the types of incidents that can cause the most harm. SIF incidents commonly lead to life-altering injuries, loss of life, and catastrophic events with multiple deaths. It’s no wonder that safety professionals and researchers have been increasing their focus on how to identify events that lead to SIFs, and how to prevent these events from occurring.

Research over the past decade has looked at various types of precursors, and systematic processes that can help prevent SIFs proactively. Experts typically recommend identifying SIF precursors, heightened education of SIFs, using root cause analysis and implementing various controls. However, research on SIFs is still an emerging field, and there is still much we do not know about the exact types of factors or events that contribute to these events.


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What Can President-Elect Donald Trump Teach Us About Safety?

Posted by  David Juristy

After reading the title of this blog entry I’m sure you’re thinking to yourself, “I can’t wait to read this one” (insert sarcastic look here). However, you’re going to need to stick with me on this one, because the answer to my initial question is…a lot. So let me explain exactly how.

Let’s start at the beginning of the industrial revolution and take a look at safety over time. Going back to the early 1900’s if we take a look at the number of fatalities and serious injuries we can see a dramatic drop over time. The question is why? There are several reasons that have facilitated the change, let’s look at a few.


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